Drinking the Sun of Corinth

by Odysseus Elytis

Drinking the sun of Corinth
Reading the marble ruins
Striding across vineyards and seas
Sighting along the harpoon
A votive fish that slips away
I found the leaves that the sun’s psalm memorizes
The living land that passion joys in opening.

I drink water, cut fruit,
Thrust my hand into the wind’s foliage
The lemon trees water the summer pollen
The green birds tear my dreams
I leave with a glance
A wide glance in which the world is recreated
Beautiful from the beginning to the dimensions of the heart!

Promise and Deceive, from Ovid’s Ars Amatoria
Don’t be shy of promising: promises entice girls: add any gods you like as witness to what you swear. Jupiter on high laughs at lovers’ perjuries, and orders Aeolus’s winds to carry them into the void. Jupiter used to swear by the Styx, falsely, to Juno: now he looks favourably on his own example. Gods are useful: as they’re useful, let’s think they’re there: take wine and incense to the ancient altars: indifferent calm and it’s like, apathy, don’t chain them: live innocently: the divine is close at hand: pay what you owe, hold dutifully to agreements: commit no fraud: let your hands be free from blood. Delude only women, if you’re wise, with impunity: where truth’s more to be guarded against than fraud. Deceive deceivers: for the most part an impious tribe: let them fall themselves into the traps they’ve set. They say in Egypt the life-giving waters failed in the fields: and there were nine years of drought, then Thrasius came to Busiris, and said that Jove might be propitiated by shedding a stranger’s blood. Busiris told him: ‘You become Jove’s first victim, and you be the stranger to give Egypt water.’ And Phalaris roasted impetuous Perillus’s body in the brazen bull: the unhappy creator was first to fill his work. Both cases were just: for there’s no fairer law than that the murderous maker should perish by his art. As liars by liars are rightfully deceived, wounded by their own example, let women grieve.

Promise and Deceive, from Ovid’s Ars Amatoria

Don’t be shy of promising: promises entice girls: add any gods you like as witness to what you swear. Jupiter on high laughs at lovers’ perjuries, and orders Aeolus’s winds to carry them into the void. Jupiter used to swear by the Styx, falsely, to Juno: now he looks favourably on his own example. Gods are useful: as they’re useful, let’s think they’re there: take wine and incense to the ancient altars: indifferent calm and it’s like, apathy, don’t chain them: live innocently: the divine is close at hand: pay what you owe, hold dutifully to agreements: commit no fraud: let your hands be free from blood. Delude only women, if you’re wise, with impunity: where truth’s more to be guarded against than fraud. Deceive deceivers: for the most part an impious tribe: let them fall themselves into the traps they’ve set. They say in Egypt the life-giving waters failed in the fields: and there were nine years of drought, then Thrasius came to Busiris, and said that Jove might be propitiated by shedding a stranger’s blood. Busiris told him: ‘You become Jove’s first victim, and you be the stranger to give Egypt water.’ And Phalaris roasted impetuous Perillus’s body in the brazen bull: the unhappy creator was first to fill his work. Both cases were just: for there’s no fairer law than that the murderous maker should perish by his art. As liars by liars are rightfully deceived, wounded by their own example, let women grieve.

Mastering the Sport of Kings

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Elementary Polo Strategy, from the Milwaukee Polo Club

All polo strategy is based on two concepts, speed and control. To a certain extent they are somewhat opposite. Unless a player is an exceptional high goal player speed must to some extent be sacrificed to control. Of the two speed is the more important factor. It is elementary that to make the play you have to get to the ball. Once the ball is struck several options present themselves. Since the ball travels approximately three times faster than the horse and the rider who last hit it, the rider can either: Follow up the ball and hit it again - hard. Follow up the ball hitting it repeatedly with short taps - dribbling. Pass the ball to a teammate.

All three options are part of a polo player’s repertoire but which will be used depends on a variety of factors: Strong players, players who are far ahead of the pack, or egomaniacs choose option one. Option two is best suited for a high goal player with great skill or to the player who is relatively surrounded by opponents and can not afford to hit the ball far for fear of an interception. Option three is considered the classic polo solution as it promotes teamwork; polo should be a passing game, it utilizes the speed disparity of horse and ball. Unfortunately, it presupposes: There is someone to pass to - not always likely if team members are not alert, not well mounted, or not experienced in playing together. There is a danger that the pass will not reach the teammate. While a pass may be intended for a teammate, a opponent may be nearby and grab it. Now all of these calculations have to be made in a split-second while continually moving both the horse and the shot.

It is fair to say no other game requires this combination of speed and sagacity. It is by repeatedly observing this choice of 1) hit the long ball; 2) tap the ball; and 3) pass the ball that the fan can determine the relative strengths of a team’s individual players and their length of experience playing together. A team with four lower goal players (if they are well mounted) can beat a team of higher goal players if Team A plays together all the time and Team B has just been assembled for the match. All of the above discussion has centered on the forward game - Team A proceeding towards its goal. Now defense must be explained. When playing defense a player also has three options: Hit the ball backward as hard as possible Hit the ball backward in a pass to a teammate. Turn the ball so as to have forward motion toward one’s own goal.

Of these three the third option is by far the most dangerous. Turning the ball is fraught with danger as it requires several movements both of horse and ball which can lead to an opponent stealing it back. While high goal players make it seem easy novices are best advised to avoid this play. Maneuver One has its disadvantages too. It does not pay to whack the ball so far that your team has to race to get it only to lose the race. Option Two is the best play but it again presupposes a teammate is in the correct position. At this juncture we can all see the drama that permeates every game. Basically the game strategies fall into three categories: The ‘go for the goal’ game. The passing game. The man to man game.

Tommy Hitchcock, Jr., certainly is in the running as the best polo player of all time. He favored the first type of game and encouraged players to hit the ball as hard as you can all of the time. Lord Mountbatten preferred the team approach to play and thus championed the ‘passing game’ and to a lesser extent the ‘man to man’ game. The best discussion of the importance of team play is found in Beginning Polo by Harry Disston (pg. 126). “Playing as a team means that each player contributes to every situation, that each helps the other, that there is coordination among them, and that in every situation each knows where the others are and what he and the others are expected to do. It means much passing, backing up and interchange of position (as against a haphazard change of position); the object is to complement each other’s efforts rather than interfering with them. This requires studying and understanding team play, sound coaching, practice, and a lot of playing together.”

As Disston was a Brigadier General he was well aware of teamwork as a necessity for success but he also was a shrewd observer of the game who wrote for Polo and the British Polo Monthly magazines. I think he would agree the worst trait in polo is also far too common - a player’s ego prevents a contribution to the team. This is something a fan can spot in a game. All these approaches have their merit and will to some extent be utilized in a single match. The race for goal game works best if all the players are high goalers and if one player dominates the game. The passing game is best if all the players or a team are of mostly equal ability and especially well if they have played together extensively. Then each player takes his counterpart and works best when both riders have comparable players. Frequently a game which results in a half time disparity will signal a change in approach for the second half. Two other sub strategies should be mentioned. Usually one player is generally likely to get the ball out of the bowl-in. This sets the pattern for a play downfield. The other is the practice of yelling to a teammate to leave the ball for a teammate coming through. This avoids the pass. The most dangerous plays in terms of losing a goal is when the defensive team has to slice the ball past the goal to save a goal and it is hit to the offensive players who are right there.

From The Art and Practice of Hawking, by E.B. Mitchell
In rook-hawking the lookers-on must be mounted; and their horses ought either to be very sure-footed or else well acquainted with the ground on which the flights take place, which is often covered with ant-hills, and in places bored by rabbit burrows. If the rider is to see anything of the longest and best flights, his horse must be able to step out in a gallop of a mile or so. In game- and lark-hawking it is less necessary, and often impossible, for the men to be mounted ; but in these cases also it is of very great advantage for at least one man to ride, so that he may follow a very long flight with a better chance of keeping the hawk in view. The horseman has a double advantage when the country is uneven. He can go faster, and he can also from his place in the saddle see farther over the brow of a hill or undulation. But ground which undulates in long ridges and valleys is to be mistrusted by falconers. When a flight, commenced in one valley, goes over the ridge which separates it from the next, it is impossible, unless there is a marker on that ridge, to know where it may have ended. Here the falconer, for once in his life, may hope that the ground on the other side is not too open, and that there may be some small covert not far off” in which the quarry is pretty sure to have stopped if he got so far. When a hawk goes out of sight over a ridge, the men following on horseback should begin to spread out like a fan, and ride on, keeping a good look-out for anything that may indicate the direction which the flight has taken.

From The Art and Practice of Hawking, by E.B. Mitchell


In rook-hawking the lookers-on must be mounted; and their horses ought either to be very sure-footed or else well acquainted with the ground on which the flights take place, which is often covered with ant-hills, and in places bored by rabbit burrows. If the rider is to see anything of the longest and best flights, his horse must be able to step out in a gallop of a mile or so. In game- and lark-hawking it is less necessary, and often impossible, for the men to be mounted ; but in these cases also it is of very great advantage for at least one man to ride, so that he may follow a very long flight with a better chance of keeping the hawk in view. The horseman has a double advantage when the country is uneven. He can go faster, and he can also from his place in the saddle see farther over the brow of a hill or undulation. But ground which undulates in long ridges and valleys is to be mistrusted by falconers. When a flight, commenced in one valley, goes over the ridge which separates it from the next, it is impossible, unless there is a marker on that ridge, to know where it may have ended. Here the falconer, for once in his life, may hope that the ground on the other side is not too open, and that there may be some small covert not far off” in which the quarry is pretty sure to have stopped if he got so far. When a hawk goes out of sight over a ridge, the men following on horseback should begin to spread out like a fan, and ride on, keeping a good look-out for anything that may indicate the direction which the flight has taken.

(Source: loscaboshorses.com)

A Different View of Cabo, showcased by Camilla Fuchs in her new photo exhibit, The Beauty That Surrounds Us.

A Different View of Cabo, showcased by Camilla Fuchs in her new photo exhibit, The Beauty That Surrounds Us.

Natural Wonders of Los Cabos

Not simply a day for red roses, romantic dinners, and the first annual Carnaval parade, Valentine’s Day in Cabo San Lucas was also a time for art, as local photographer Camilla Fuchs unveiled her new exhibition, titled “The Beauty That Surrounds Us,” at Puerto Paraiso Mall. The opening of the 26-piece exhibit was attended by a crowd of well wishers and collectors, and included food and wine courtesy of Marina fine dining fixture Solomon’s Landing, as well as a stirring performance from the Coro Juvenil de Los Cabos.

Cabo San Lucas and Destination Weddings

For that special touch of traditional Mexican elegance, master equestrian Francisco Barrena’s Cuadra San Francisco has a fleet of horse-drawn carriages to transport the bride and groom and other members of the wedding party to and from the ceremony or reception in the highest of Cabo style.

Todos Santos Art Festival

Todos Santos is perhaps best known for hosting one of Mexico’s most prolific artists’ colonies, an asset the legally designated Pueblo Magico – literally, magical village – shows off to great advantage in its yearly art festival. The 16th incarnation of the annual Todos Santos Art Festival is scheduled from February 13th through 17th, 2013, and will feature works from local artists and galleries, as well as showcasing traditional Mexican performance arts like folk dancing.

A Seasonal Sports Guide for Los Cabos

The annual influx of Mexican, American, and Canadian students during Spring Break and Semana Santa makes this a great season for mixologists and cultural anthropologists, but hardly ideal for some of our other favorite pastimes. Nonetheless, this is my favorite time of year for the grand old game of golf. Los Cabos has a number of great courses to include in the sports guide for Los Cabos, courtesy of design efforts by major champions like Nicklaus, Norman, Player, and Love (a second Diamante layout by Tiger Woods is also in the offing), and this is the perfect time to see visiting golfers in all their plus four plumage. Bargain hunting duffers may prefer the fall, when rates drop, but the weather is often so hot and stifling that it is hard to summon enough energy to kick your tee shots out of the rough, and sandbag gullible types by heartily overstating your handicap. Spring is ideal, in my opinion. The winter winds have abated, the greens have softened, and beverage service is at its most attentive.

Ah, fill the Cup:—what boots it to repeat 
How Time is slipping underneath our Feet:
Unborn TO-MORROW and dead YESTERDAY,
Why fret about them if TO-DAY be sweet!
- Omar Khayyam, Rubaiyat

Ah, fill the Cup:—what boots it to repeat 

How Time is slipping underneath our Feet:

Unborn TO-MORROW and dead YESTERDAY,

Why fret about them if TO-DAY be sweet!

- Omar Khayyam, Rubaiyat